April 16, 2014
George Valdez
All we really have is the process 

George Valdez

All we really have is the process 

April 16, 2014
vintageanchorbooks:

“People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they’ll go to any length to live longer. But don’t think that’s the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you’re going to while away the years, it’s far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive then in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree”  ― Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

vintageanchorbooks:

“People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they’ll go to any length to live longer. But don’t think that’s the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you’re going to while away the years, it’s far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive then in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree”
― Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

April 15, 2014

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

April 15, 2014
Photo by George Valdez

Photo by George Valdez

April 15, 2014
Photo by George Valdez

Photo by George Valdez

April 14, 2014
tsparks:

tortle:

catbuttcat:

rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens. 
Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators. 
Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society: Sign the petition here.
(via: American Bird Conservancy)

It’s really close, please sign guys!

killing one species to ‘protect’ another is a horrible approach to anything. Have people not learned by now? And how many other animals would this inevitably poison? Ones that would also not only ingest the poison, but the poisoned bird carcasses.What is wrong with people.

Crows and Ravens hold a sacred position in the Mythos of North America, they should be honored and revered not murdered. 

tsparks:

tortle:

catbuttcat:

rhamphotheca:

State of Idaho plans to poison up to 4,000 Common Ravens.

Justification: Ravens prey on the eggs of the imperiled Greater Sage-Grouse. Yet of 19 reasons for the grouse’s declining numbers, predation by other wildlife comes in at #12. Providing protected areas and requiring sustainable land management are the most important ways to conserve the grouse, not killing avian predators.

Join petition by Golden Eagle Audubon Society:

Sign the petition here.

(via: American Bird Conservancy)

It’s really close, please sign guys!

killing one species to ‘protect’ another is a horrible approach to anything. Have people not learned by now? And how many other animals would this inevitably poison? Ones that would also not only ingest the poison, but the poisoned bird carcasses.

What is wrong with people.

Crows and Ravens hold a sacred position in the Mythos of North America, they should be honored and revered not murdered. 

April 14, 2014
Atelier Derneburg 1986

Atelier Derneburg 1986

April 14, 2014
Marc Mulders 

Marc Mulders 

8:20pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D3dsLq
  
Filed under: art marc mulders 
April 14, 2014
sfmoma:

"…in some ways, this is the most crucial stage of all: clearing the way for what follows and, in the process, learning what still must be done to adapt the designed expansion to the structure that exists.”
The SF Chronicle got an exclusive look inside our under-construction building last week. Check it out→

sfmoma:

"…in some ways, this is the most crucial stage of all: clearing the way for what follows and, in the process, learning what still must be done to adapt the designed expansion to the structure that exists.”

The SF Chronicle got an exclusive look inside our under-construction building last week. Check it out

8:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D3d5D_
  
Filed under: sfmoma home 
April 14, 2014
Sculpture by George Valdez
Mixed media  Sealed envelopes with painted duck

Sculpture by George Valdez

Mixed media  Sealed envelopes with painted duck

April 14, 2014
Christian Vetter’s studio

Christian Vetter’s studio

6:42pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D35QuO
  
Filed under: art christian vetter 
April 14, 2014
Andy Warhol 1965

Andy Warhol 1965

April 14, 2014
Matthew Barney
Mathew in his flooded studio after Hurricane Irene

Matthew Barney

Mathew in his flooded studio after Hurricane Irene

6:26pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D2-gNg
  
Filed under: art matthew barney 
April 14, 2014
theatlantic:

Surviving Syria’s Civil War With Heavy Metal

On a scorching August day in 2011, in the city of Homs, the Syrian conflict nearly swallowed Monzer Darwish. The 23-year-old graphic designer, who grew up in nearby Hama, had stopped at a cafe with his fiancée, only to take cover in the establishment at the sound of screaming outside. When they finally ventured into the street, they heard a pop—pop, pop, and someone fell. Then everyone ran. “The whole street was literally on fire,” he recalled.
Fleeing the violence, Darwish wrestled with the kinds of questions many face during war. What do you do if you don’t want to take a side? If you don’t want to take up arms? If you want to keep your community from being torn apart? If you can’t escape? Many of his friends found themselves in a similar situation, and they sought emotional refuge through music, even live heavy-metal concerts near the frontlines. Reconnecting with these peers, Darwish decided to film how this alternative community—musicians and fans alike—was surviving amid the country’s three-year civil war.
Heavy metal, with its macabre poetry, thundering elegies, and violent moshing, has often resonated with young people and helped them express solidarity with one another during periods of political and social tension. But Darwish wanted to show how Syria’s “metal heads” and alternative youth, like their peers in Iraq and Afghanistan, are turning to the music not only as a way to cope with mass trauma, but also as a means of conducting a brutally honest dialogue about how to survive war and reform society.
The result: a rockumentary called Syrian Metal Is War. For much of the last year, Darwish has crisscrossed the country to film every metal musician he can find. He’s uploaded a trailer to YouTube, and he hopes to screen a rough cut of the full film in Beirut by late spring.
Read more. [Image: Daniel J. Gerstle]

theatlantic:

Surviving Syria’s Civil War With Heavy Metal

On a scorching August day in 2011, in the city of Homs, the Syrian conflict nearly swallowed Monzer Darwish. The 23-year-old graphic designer, who grew up in nearby Hama, had stopped at a cafe with his fiancée, only to take cover in the establishment at the sound of screaming outside. When they finally ventured into the street, they heard a pop—pop, pop, and someone fell. Then everyone ran. “The whole street was literally on fire,” he recalled.

Fleeing the violence, Darwish wrestled with the kinds of questions many face during war. What do you do if you don’t want to take a side? If you don’t want to take up arms? If you want to keep your community from being torn apart? If you can’t escape? Many of his friends found themselves in a similar situation, and they sought emotional refuge through music, even live heavy-metal concerts near the frontlines. Reconnecting with these peers, Darwish decided to film how this alternative community—musicians and fans alike—was surviving amid the country’s three-year civil war.

Heavy metal, with its macabre poetry, thundering elegies, and violent moshing, has often resonated with young people and helped them express solidarity with one another during periods of political and social tension. But Darwish wanted to show how Syria’s “metal heads” and alternative youth, like their peers in Iraq and Afghanistan, are turning to the music not only as a way to cope with mass trauma, but also as a means of conducting a brutally honest dialogue about how to survive war and reform society.

The result: a rockumentary called Syrian Metal Is War. For much of the last year, Darwish has crisscrossed the country to film every metal musician he can find. He’s uploaded a trailer to YouTube, and he hopes to screen a rough cut of the full film in Beirut by late spring.

Read more. [Image: Daniel J. Gerstle]

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

5:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D2jPzJ
  
Filed under: art music 
April 14, 2014
zoomar:

This is how you write “Jesus”.

zoomar:

This is how you write “Jesus”.

(Source: johnnythehorse, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

5:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZAY1Av1D2fZgN
  
Filed under: art jesus